Septimus Heap and International Children’s Book Day

Me reading to my boys (a few years ago)
Me reading to my boys (who no longer fit on my lap)

When my boys were little, we did a lot of reading aloud, including Angie Sage’s Septimus Heap books, a 7-book, middle-grade fantasy series about the seventh son of a seventh son. We read books 1-3, then got book 4 when it came out. By the time book 5 came out, we were reading them on our own, and I had forgotten so much about the earlier books, that I didn’t know what was going on all the time. I decided I’d wait for books 6 and 7 to come out and then start at the beginning again.

And then the years went by and I forgot….

Until I found book 7 in a store two weeks ago and re-started the series. Wow! It is even better than I remembered. Angie Sage’s world building is fabulous. She has many, many characters and they are well developed and interesting. The plot moves like an out-of-control roller coaster. The writing is clever and funny.

But the best thing. The most notable thing about this series: The number of female characters. The number of female characters either matches or is greater than the number of male characters. The female characters have important roles too.

The first in the series
The first in the series

This kingdom is a matriarchy, with power passing from Queen to Princess. Ten-year-old Princess Jenna is a main character, as “main” as the title character of Septimus. There are male and female wizards, but the top wizard, the Extra-Ordinary Wizard, is a woman. There is a coven of witches (all female) and a female boat builder. A series about a boy named Septimus Heap, who is the seventh son of a seventh son, is going to have a lot of boys in it. And it does. But not more boys than girls.

It is so rare to find as many female characters as male characters in a fantasy novel that this book seems female-heavy. Yet, when you sit down and count, the numbers of male and female characters are even. Just like real life.

Is this important? I think so.

Harry Potter has Hermione and Professor McGonagall and Bellatrix, but each of them stands in the shadow of a more important male character: Harry, Dumbledore, Voldemort. All the key characters are male.

I don’t blame JK Rowling. Would her books have gotten the same attention if Harry had been Henrietta, the girl who lived? I doubt it.

Angie Sage's Septimus Heap series (I must have loaned out book 2)
Angie Sage’s Septimus Heap series (I must have loaned out book 2)

So, please, on this International Children’s Book Day, buy (or borrow) the Septimus Heap series (Magyk, Flyte, Physik, Queste, Syren, Darke, and Fyre) and read them to your favorite children.

You will be struck by the number of female characters. But guess what? Your children won’t.

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3 thoughts on “Septimus Heap and International Children’s Book Day

  1. Excellent post. I was checking constantly this weblog and I’m
    impressed! Extremely useful info specially the closing part 🙂 I take
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    Thanks and best of luck.

  2. Started this comment once, lost it…do I know what I’m doing? Questionable! Anyway, thanks for the suggestion. Not sure how I missed these books! Bought and read Magkk, then quickly got Flyte and Physik and burned through them…working on Queste. The only limit is my Kindle budget! Are they kid’s books? Don’t know, don’t care. I love re-reading my childhood favs, like the Borrowers series, and I love having a Kindle. I can read three or four books at a time, switching back and forth depending on my mood…and there’s never a pile of heavy books to tote around…only my tiny Kindle, shoved in my purse (in the totally cute Harry Potter cover my daughter got me). Guess I will be watching your blog from now on for great book suggestions 🙂

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