Busy, Busy, Busy

I’m working full time this semester and have been too busy to write for this blog or to do any writing at all. Hopefully that will change in the spring when I am back to teaching part time. I’m still reading like crazy, though. Look for my Best of 2018 post in early January.

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Welcome Back!

Happy First Day of School!

I know some of you have been back to school for a while, and some of you don’t go to school anymore…. so, Happy Tuesday to you!

This fall, my children’s literature students have a great list of books to choose from for their literature circles. It’s a good mix of some old favorites and some new stars. Here they are:

kids lit fall 2018

Fantasy

The Girl Who Drank the Moon by Kelly Barnhill

The One and Only Ivan by Katherine Applegate

Historical Fiction

Bud, Not Buddy by Christopher Paul Curtis

Call It Courage by Armstrong Sperry

Roll of Thunder, Hear My Cry by Mildred Taylor

A Year Down Yonder by Richard Peck

Contemporary Realistic Fiction

From the Mixed-Up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler by E.L. Konigsburg

Shiloh by Phyllis Reynolds

The Westing Game by Ellen Raskin

“Mixed” Genre

Hello, Universe by Erin Entrada Kelly

Holes by Louis Sachar

It’s going to be a great semester! Enjoy the new season!

 

Exciting News: Twice

!ADiscoveredDiamond[1][1]News #1: A month or two ago I mentioned that Syncopation: A Memoir of Adele Hugo was named a “diamond” and that a review on the Discovering Diamonds website would be forthcoming. The review is up, and it is lovely.

Syncopation_EcoverNews #2: Syncopation: A Memoir of Adele Hugo is now available as an e-book on amazonUS and amazonUK.

If you have already read Syncopation, consider writing a review of it on amazon: all reviews are welcome, whether you loved it or hated it. After all, no book is for everyone, and shoppers should know if it is a good match for them or not.

 

 

A Book Series You Must Read!

broken earth books

I’m not waiting until my “best books of the year” post to tell you about a series I just finished, N.K. Jemisin’s The Broken Earth trilogy. This is one of the best fantasy series I’ve ever read–and I read a lot of fantasy! The first book in the series, The Fifth Season, won the Hugo Award in 2016. The second book, The Obelisk Gate, won the Hugo Award in 2017, and the final book of the trilogy, The Stone Sky, is a finalist for the 2018 Hugo Award (announced in August).

I don’t want to spoil your reading experience by telling you a lot about these books; instead, I’m going to focus on why you should read them.

1. Strong female characters. The main characters in this series are female. The side characters are female. The only-meet-them-once characters are female. Yes, there are male characters, and they are interesting characters, but this is a story about women. The experience of reading this is the inverse of nearly every fantasy novel I’ve ever read.

Talk about whole new worlds!

I fear that by explaining this, you men won’t want to read the series, but you should! You should read it and allow the experience to open your eyes to what it is like to be a female reader of fantasy!

Did I mention that nearly all the characters are black too? Kaboom!

There are excellent reasons, in terms of world building, that this story is populated by people of color and that women are the movers and shakers–read it to find out why!

2. World Building. Another reason to read this series. The development of the setting is phenomenal! This is sort of our world…maybe… not really. Something really bad happened to the Earth (which you don’t discover until the end of the first book), so there are problems with volcanoes and earthquakes and tsunamis, etc. The fifth season refers to a time on the planet when eruptions and earthquakes and other natural disasters damage the air and land so severely that the human race is nearly wiped out–again and again. These “seasons” happen periodically. Here is a poem from The Fifth Season that explains the phenomenon:

Winter, Spring, Summer, Fall;

Death is the fifth and master of all.

Did that give you goosebumps? I got them the first time I read it.

3. Symbolism/Metaphor/Literary-ness. There is depth to this story. The plot is exciting and engaging, and you can read and enjoy it just for that. But there is so much more going on. I don’t want to spoil any of this for you, so I won’t explain all the incredible layers of meaning in these books. This is one of those stories that you think about for days, weeks, months after you finish. You can savor this story, over and over, and marvel at all the things N.K. Jemisin accomplished.

That’s it. I hope you are curious and eager to get these books. Let me know, below, if you’ve read them, or if my blog convinces you to read them, and if you love them as much as I do.

Discovering Diamonds

!ADiscoveredDiamond[1][1]I’m pleased to announce that Syncopation has been selected as a Diamond by the reviewers at the Discovering Diamonds blog. It will be featured on the site May 18th.

Discovering Diamonds is a book review site for historical fiction, bringing attention to well written books published by small presses or self published. The reviewers read many independently published books, and most are not designated a Diamond. I’m stunned and honored that Syncopation is receiving this accolade.

Discovering Diamonds is a wonderful resource for readers of historical fiction who would like to find new books, especially exceptional books overlooked by mainstream publishers. I encourage you to visit the site, to find and read some of the other Diamonds they have discovered.

Happy Reading!

Children’s Literature, Spring 2018

I usually post what my students will be reading, and I’m late getting this up. Here are the books they can choose from this semester:

Modern Fantasy:

The One and Only Ivan by Katherine Applegate

The Girl Who Drank the Moon by Kelly Barnhill

The BFG by Roald Dahl

Historical Fiction:

Roll of Thunder, Hear by Cry by Mildred Taylor

Sarah, Plain and Tall by Patricia MacLachlan

Call It Courage by Armstrong Sperry

I Survived: The Battle of Gettysburg by Lauren Tarshis

Contemporary Realistic Fiction:

Dear Mr. Henshaw by Beverly Cleary

Ghost by Jason Reynolds

The Goldfish Boy by Lisa Thompson

“Mixed Genre” novels:

The Whipping Boy by Sid Fleischman

Holes by Louis Sachar

Out of the Dust by Karen Hesse

Everyone is currently reading The Wizard of Oz, and each student will choose two other books, based on an author and on a theme.

It’s going to be a great semester of reading!